Free museum admission. A bustling marketplace to explore. Live music. Cheap eats. Pinching pennies won't leave you feeling a bit deprived on a Midwest weekend getaway to Cleveland.

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Cleveland Museum of Art It's not every day you get to commune with creative masters like Renoir, Monet, Dali and Picasso for free. A cultural anchor of the University Circle district, this powerhouse museum underwent a massive $350 million expansion-renovation to help visitors enjoy and appreciate the art even more. clevelandart.org

Cleveland Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of Larry E. Highbaugh Jr.
Cleveland Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of Larry E. Highbaugh Jr.

West Side Market This century-old foodie paradise is Cleveland's oldest public marketplace. Back in the day, Polish and Italian immigrants flocked here to find food products of their homelands. Today, more than 100 booths and stalls teem with vendors and artisan producers selling everything from soup to nuts. The pierogis here make an excellent lunch, if you haven't already filled up on all the free samples. westsidemarket.org

West Side Market. Photo courtesy of Larry E. Highbaugh Jr.
West Side Market. Photo courtesy of Larry E. Highbaugh Jr.

Amish Country Bucolic scenery, home-cooked goodies and handmade crafts make the 40-mile drive east to Geauga County's Amish Country worthwhile. Exploring this territory feels like stepping back in time. A self-guided driving tour cruises past Amish businesses, restaurants and bed-and-breakfasts; plan on frequent stops to browse rustic wares at the shops and pick up some penny candy at the End of the Commons, a general store that's been around since 1840.

Happy Dog At this casual Cleveland dining institution, $7 scores you a quarter-pound hot dog with as many toppings as you can load on. The list of 50 options ranges from basic ketchup and mustard to the more unusual like Brazilian chimichurri sauce, bourbon baked beans and even housemade chunky peanut butter. We recommend forking over an extra $5 for a side of tater tots. Wash it all down with a cold beer and stick around for live music in the evenings. Three words—polka happy hour! happydogcleveland.com

Happy Dog. Photo courtesy of www.positivelycleveland.com/Scott Meivogel.
Happy Dog. Photo courtesy of www.positivelycleveland.com/Scott Meivogel.

Third Fridays at West 78th Street Studios On Cleveland's west side, the 1905 building formerly known as American Greetings Creative Studios now holds an enclave of artists working in a gamut of styles and media. Among the 40 or so tenants, you'll find not only the expected array of painters and sculptors but also music studios, auctioneers, a clothing line and an architectural design firm. Check them all out for free on the third Friday of each month during an indoor gallery crawl complete with live entertainment, great food and a pop-up market. 78thstreetstudios.com

Lakeview Cemetery Lakeview is so scenic that it feels more like a sculpture garden than a final resting place. Founded in 1869, this 285-acre property bordering University Circle was inspired by counterparts in France and Victorian England. Famous people buried here include U.S. President James A. Garfield, John D. Rockefeller and Elliot Ness. From the highest spots, you'll catch great views of Lake Erie and the downtown Cleveland skyline. lakeviewcemetery.com

Mama Santa's Celebrating Cleveland's rich Italian heritage, Mama Santa's dishes up old-world Sicilian favorites and to-die-for pizzas. A local tradition since 1961, this family-run eatery makes all the pastas, sauces and dough from scratch using traditional Italian recipes. Spaghetti, ravioli, cannelloni, manicotti, fettuccini, rigatoni-mamma mia! Best of all? A steaming bowl of pasta or a large pizza with a couple toppings will set you back only about $10. mamasantas.com

Rockefeller Park Greenhouse This stunning four-seasons garden spot is a breath of fresh air any time of year. Created to grow and supply plants for landscaping Cleveland's public parks and gardens, the 1-acre facility now also welcomes the public. Displays include all sorts of flora, including cacti and roses, and the outdoor "talking garden" is a thoughtful feature for the visually impaired.  https://www.facebook.com/RockefellerGreenhouse