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Tahquamenon Falls State Park

41382 West M-123
Paradise  Michigan  49768
United States
(906) 492-3415
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Midwest Living Review

Aaron Peterson
Tahquamenon Falls State Park’s Lower Falls campground is a large, shady and well-maintained facility near the park’s centerpiece waterfalls in the sparsely populated Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Tahquamenon Falls State Park’s Lower Falls campground is a large, shady and well-maintained facility near the park’s centerpiece waterfalls in the sparsely populated Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The sprawling 50,000-acre state park is named for its striking main attraction, the 200-foot wide and 50-foot high Upper Tahquamenon Falls. The campground is located a short drive downstream, within walking distance of the smaller Lower Tahquamenon Falls.

Lower Falls Campground is divided into two units, the Riverbend and the Overlook. Both facilities offer packed earth pads, paved access roads, and centrally located showers and flush toilets. However, the Riverbend bathrooms and playground are newer, and the sites give better access to the river and hiking trails. Sites at both locations feature picnic tables, fire rings and electric service. Water is not available at camping sites, but spigots can be found in several locations. A concessionaire visits the campground once a day with firewood, but other amenities must be sought out at a nearby general store. The region is remote with few amenities and no chain stores or restaurants; however, the local dining and shopping options, while a little rough on the outside, are friendly and affordable.

Visitors can rent a rowboat to explore the Lower Falls, where a series of cascades split around an island on an elbow in the broad but slow moving river. Motorboat rides to the island are available. A number of hiking trails radiate out from the campground area into the thick pine and spruce forest surrounding the river. A state park interpreter offers daily programs, including guided hikes to a bear den. Wildlife abounds in the region, and nearby Newberry (population: 1,500) is the official Moose Capital of Michigan. Lucky campers can sometimes catch a glimpse of the enormous animals wading along the river in the morning and evening.

Campers should be prepared for biting insects and cool temperatures off nearby Lake Superior.

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