Pattern Play: DIY Garden Spheres | Midwest Living
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Pattern Play: DIY Garden Spheres

Concrete spheres dress up any garden. Shop big-box stores for concrete molds for large spheres (follow manufacturer's direction), or create smaller orb accents using found items from thrift stores and garage sales—or maybe even your garage—with this tutorial.

The geometric shape of concrete spheres adds a fun yet sophisticated touch to your garden. Try tucking them next to container plants, nestling them in greenery and grasses or using them as accents for your steps. Below are instructions on how to make your own spheres.

What You'll Need:

  • Glass sphere mold (A globe light fixture or Christmas ornament are inexpensive and easy-to-find examples.)
  • Small bucket
  • Newspaper
  • Cooking spray
  • Large bucket
  • Plastic cup
  • Rubber gloves
  • Five-pound bag of concrete mix
  • Water
  • Stir stick
  • Large heavy-duty plastic bag
  • Safety goggles
  • Hammer
  • Soft cloth

If desired:

  • Black exterior paint
  • Paint roller

Instructions:

Step 1: Line the small bucket with newspaper.

Step 2: Spray the inside of the glass globe with cooking spray. Then, place the globe inside the bucket, open side up. Tuck more newspaper around the globe until stable.

Step 3: While wearing plastic gloves, combine concrete mix and several cups of water in the large bucket. Mix with the stir stick until you reach a thick milkshake-like consistency, adding water as necessary.

Step 4: Use the plastic cup to transfer the concrete mixture into the glass globe. Once full, carefully twist the globe back and forth to remove potential air bubbles. Let the concrete dry for 48 hours.

Step 5: Place the globe of dried concrete into the heavy-duty plastic bag. Seal it closed, and put on the safety goggles and rubber gloves. Next, gently hammer around the globe to crack the glass.

Step 6: Remove the concrete ball from the bag. Wipe off any glass remnants with the soft cloth.

Step 7: Keep the natural finish for a simple garden accent, or go glossy by applying two coats of black exterior paint with a roller brush. Touch up the paint every other year to maintain the polish.

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